The Idolatry of Trusting in “Masculine Strength”

From cover to cover, the Bible is a lesson in NOT trusting in human strength and wisdom.

Satan tempted Adam and Eve to eat the forbidden fruit so that they would allegedly be like God. They would not need to trust in God’s love for them, God’s provision, wisdom or power.

After eating from this forbidden tree, Adam began to rule over his wife.

Pharaoh ruled over the Israelites in Egypt through violence: through the strong arm and the master’s whip, through an armed force of horses and chariots.

Ancient customs across many cultures gave the right of inheritance to the oldest male: the offspring thought best able to use human strength to rule over home, land and slaves.

Rome prized male offspring and rewarded those who showed themselves strong through military conquest.

What has God’s response been to this celebration and reliance on “man” power?

Adam and Eve were expelled from paradise.

Pharaoh’s army was consumed in the Red Sea, and Israel was liberated.

God intentionally ignored the custom of giving power to firstborn sons in the case of Isaac (Ishmael was firstborn, but Isaac became the child of promise), Joseph (his brothers were older, but he became a ruler in Egypt), Esau (he was firstborn, but Jacob became Israel). David (his brothers were older, but he slew Goliath, delivered Israel from oppression and became King).

Deborah was chosen as a judge, prophet and ruler in Israel, even though there were plenty of men available.

Jael, a woman, slew the leader of an army of oppressors.

After delivering Israel from Egypt, every Israelite family was required to surrender their firstborn son to God. Why? Because God did not want them trusting in the “earthly custom” of depending on human strength. They were not to rely on the strength of the oldest male. They were to remember that they were delivered from Egypt by God’s “strong hand” and “powerful arm.” Instead of literally giving up their firstborn son, each Israelite family could pay 5 shekels. A Levite priesthood of all men would be dedicated to God as a sign that Israel would trust in God alone for strength, wisdom and provision; NOT in the limited, fallible resources of human beings—specifically men.

When Abraham trusted in the strength of his own flesh to fulfill God’s promise, he was told to circumcise himself as a reminder to trust in God alone.

God surrendered his own Firstborn Son to death on the cross, and then raised him up by Divine power, to free humanity from the oppression of sin.

In Christ, now, there is neither slave nor free, male nor female; we are all one. We have all been set free from sin and death, through faith in the love of God, made known to us in the sacrifice of Jesus Christ.

All followers of Jesus are called to surrender themselves to God as living sacrifices, desiring to know God’s love and to share it with a hurting world.

Every follower of Jesus Christ who yields to the leading of God’s Spirit is therefore referred to as being part of a “holy priesthood.”

God purposely did not choose those that “the world” considered strong to carry his message of freedom to humanity. He chose those whom the world “considered” weak and lowly.

Jesus did not deliver humanity through a show of force, but through the apparent weakness of the cross, surrendering to the Roman authorities, to die the death assigned to disobedient slaves.

And so, when church leaders tell people that God made men to rule over women, when wives are told to obey the authority of their husbands, when church leaders tell us that Adam was meant to protect and provide for Eve through his “masculine strength”; they are reading their Bibles upside down.

It’s time for them, and those who follow their teaching, to repent of the idolatry of trusting in the limited and fallible “strength” of human males.

“This is what the LORD says: ‘Cursed is the one who trusts in man, who draws strength from mere flesh and whose heart turns away from the LORD.'” (Jeremiah 17:5)

Advertisements

Is Christianity a Male Supremacy Cult?

Simply put, the answer is “no.”

In the New Testament time period, Roman law and Jewish oral tradition did not view the testimony of women as reliable.  In spite of these cultural norms, women were the first to be chosen to bear witness to Jesus’ resurrection—the sign of his triumph over sin and death (Luke 24:1-10).

The apostle Paul tells us there is “neither…male nor female,” for we are all “one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28).  In the body of Christ, men and women are called to serve according to their gifts, not according to their sex at birth (Romans 12:6-8).

In the book of Acts, we see women prophesying (Acts 21:9), and a woman named Priscilla teaching a man “the way of God more accurately” (Acts 18:26).

Phoebe was a deacon who made leadership decisions about supporting the ministry of the apostle Paul and others (Romans 16:1-2).

Junia, a woman, was “outstanding among the apostles” (Romans 16:7).

If the New Testament tells us that women and men are equally redeemed, equally sanctified, and equally called to serve God in accordance with their gifts, why do we even wonder if Christianity teaches that women should be subordinate to men?

Because a male supremacy cult does operate within the church, and it does masquerade as Christianity.

One of this cult’s present-day leaders recently equated the doctrine of male authority–which he calls complementarianism–with Christianity: “So, the reason among all the other reasons that I mentioned and could mention that I believe complementarianism will endure is not a passing fancy–is not going to go away–is that no matter how great opposition to Christianity becomes, there will always be a remnant of complementarians willing to die for the truth” (John Piper, desiringGod, April 19, 2017).

John Piper may or may not realize it, but his belief in male authority and female subordination cannot be found anywhere in the teachings of Christ.  In other words, it is not Christian.

John Piper refers to himself as a 7 point Calvinist (traditionally Calvinism is viewed as having only 5 main tenets).  In other words, he derives his understanding of the Bible from the 16th century commentary work of John Calvin (desiringGod, January 23, 2006).

This is what Calvin had to say about women: “Let the woman be satisfied with her state of subjection and not take it ill that she is made inferior to the more distinguished sex” (Calvin’s Commentaries: Vol. 39).

John Calvin did not take his view of women from the teachings of Jesus Christ; rather, he was strongly influenced by the 4th century commentary work of a man named Augustine (Institutes of the Christian Religion, Book III).

This is what Augustine had to say about women:

It is the natural order among people that women serve their husbands and children their parents, because the justice of this lies in (the principle that) the lesser serves the greater . . . This is the natural justice that the weaker brain serve the stronger.  This therefore is the evident justice in the relationships between slaves and their masters, that they who excel in reason, excel in power. (Questions on the Heptateuch, Book I, § 153)

Augustine did not derive his view of women from the teachings of Jesus Christ: rather, he was influenced by what he referred to as “the books of the Platonists” (Augustine’s Confessions, Book VII).

This is what Plato had to say about women:

Let me further note that the manifold and complex pleasures and desires and pains are generally found in children and women and slaves….  Whereas the simple and moderate desires which follow reason, and are under the guidance of the mind and true opinion, are to be found only in a few, and those the best born and best educated…

Very true.  These two, as you may perceive, have a place in our State; and the meaner desires of the [many] are held down by the virtuous desires and wisdom of the few [the best born and best educated men]…

You are quite right, he replied, in maintaining the general inferiority of the female sex….” (Plato’s Republic)

Is Christianity a male supremacy cult?  No, but there is a male supremacy cult within the church that claims to represent Christianity.

When human philosophy attempted to infiltrate the early church, the apostle Paul wrote, “See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the elemental spiritual forces of this world rather than on Christ” (Colossians 2:8).

I believe he would say the same today, regarding the deceptive philosophy and human tradition of male authority.